Programme
Programme
Programme

Conference Themes


Clinical ethics in translation: linking practice with research, learning and policy

There are 5 sub themes


Ethical challenges in the clinic: an impetus for research and education
Emerging challenges for clinical ethics include the use of innovative and unlicensed treatments, bedside rationing, and boundaries between health and social care

Theoretical foundations and conceptual frameworks of clinical ethics support
Will developing and articulating theoretical foundations for clinical ethics help to strengthen practice? What counts as a theoretical foundation and is it required? How can we foster dialogue between practice and theory?

Empirical ethics research: emerging from and informing clinical ethics practice
There are many questions that clinical ethics can pose for researchers. How can we identify and build on examples of high quality research to improve practice?

Translating clinical ethics across global contexts
How does clinical ethics practice, research and education translate across cultures and what can we learn from each other to improve our own practice?

Translating clinical ethics into advocacy and policy
What role should clinical ethics have in shaping policy at a regional, national or international level on issues such as migrant health, abortion or transplant ethics? Should clinical ethicists act as advocates for patients in the wider health care environment?

21st June

0800-0900

Registration

 

0900-0915

Welcome address

Wing May Kong: Chair, Board of Trustees Institute of Medical Ethics

0915-1115

Opening plenaries: Philosophical foundations and clinical practice.  Does clinical ethics need theory

1.    Bobbie Farsides
Professor of bioethics and clinical ethics, Brighton Sussex      Medical School UK

2.    Bert Molewijk
Associate Professor, Clinical Ethics Support at both the Centre for Medical Ethics (CME) at the University of Oslo (UIO) in Norway, and at the Department of Medical Humanities of the VU Medical Centre in Amsterdam

3.    Ross Upshur
Canada Research Chair in Primary Care Research; Professor,  Department of Family and Community Medicine and Dalla Lana  School of Public Health, University of Toronto Former Director  of  Joint Centre for Bioethics Toronto Canada

1115-1145

Coffee Break

 

1145-1315

Parallel sessions 1

 

1315-1415

Lunch

 

1415-1530

Plenary session 2: Translating clinical ethics across global contexts

1.    Ingrid Miljeteig
Associate Professor in Medical Ethics, Institute for global health  and community medicine. University of Bergen and
Dawit Desalegn, Director of Centre for ethics and priority setting,  School of Medicine Addis Ababa 

2.    Dr Claudia Turner
CEO, Angkor Hospital for Children, Siem Reap, Cambodia

1530-1600

Coffee Break

 
  1600-1705

Parallel sessions 2

 

 

1715-1830

Poster Viewing and Drinks reception

 

1830-1930

Public symposium: ‘Inside the ethics committee’

 

22nd June

0830-0900

Registration

 

0900-1015

Plenary session 3: extending the boundaries of clinical ethics practice

1.  Alison Murdoch 
Professor of reproductive medicine Newcastle University 

2.  Mark G. Kuczewski 
Professor of Medical Ethics Director of the Neiswanger Institute for Bioethics and Health Policy and past president of the American Society for Bioethics and Humanities (ASBH)

1015-1045

Coffee Break

 

1045-1245

Parallel sessions 3

 

1245-1345

Lunch

 

1345-1500

Plenary session 4: Ethical responsibilities at the interface of health and social care

1.  Jacqueline Chin 
Associate Professor, Centre for Biomedical Ethics (CBmE), Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine

2.  Anne Gallagher 
Professor of Ethics and Care University of Surrey

1500-1530

Coffee Break

 

1530-1700

Parallel sessions 4

 
 

 

 

1900

Conference Dinner

The Conference Dinner will take place at the MacDonald Randolph Hotel and will feature a welcome drink, a three-course meal plus entertainment from the fabulous Jukebox Band.  

Please note that there is an additional charge of £55.00 to attend the dinner.

23rd June

0830-0900

Registration

 

0900-0915

Presentation of Hans Shwager award and poster/presentation prizes

 

0915-1030

Plenary session 5: Clinical ethics research and practice

1.  Michael Dunn 
University of Oxford

2.  Professor Stella Reiter-Theil
University of Basel

1030-1100

Coffee Break

 

1100-1230

Parallel sessions 5

 

1230-1300

Closing remarks and announcement of 2019 conference

 

1300

Conference close and Lunch

 

Confirmed Speakers



Jacqueline Chin, Singapore

Dr Jacqueline Chin is Associate Professor at the Centre for Biomedical Ethics (CBmE), Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine. Trained as a moral philosopher at the University of Oxford, her research of the past nine years addresses national and globally-relevant capacity-building in biomedical ethics. She has conceptualized and led key projects such as CENTRES (since 2009), commissioned by the Ministry of Health for networking and supporting clinical ethics committees in Singapore’s restructured and private hospitals; What Doctors Say About Care of the Dying, an empirical ethics study of doctors’ perspectives on end-of-life decisions (2010–2011) aimed at informing professional stakeholders, policymakers and the public; Making Difficult Decisions with Patients and Families (2014), an online casebook (www.bioethicscasebook.sg) which recently featured in a 2015 Hastings Center Report’s special collection of papers on Bioethics Education by the US Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues; and Vol 2 of the online casebook, Caring for Older People in an Ageing Society (2017), which engages with ethical challenges of eldercare among health workers in community care settings.

Her publications in medical education include ‘Does Ethics Education Produce Ethical Doctors’ (2007)  and ‘Evaluating the Effects of an Integrated Medical Ethics Curriculum on First-Year Students’ (2011), co-authored with Alastair V Campbell and Teck-Chuan Voo, et al. Other research publications and commentaries include: ‘Integration of palliative and supportive cancer care in Asia’ in the Lancet Oncology (2012), ‘Transplant tourism or international transplant medicine? A case for making the distinction’ in the American Journal of Transplantation (2012), and ‘Evolving legal responses to dependence on families in New Zealand and Singapore healthcare’ in the Journal of Medical Ethics (2012), ‘Where families and healthcare meet.’ Journal of Medical Ethics (2014), Clarifying the best interests standard: the elaborative and enumerative strategies in public policy-making, Journal of Medical Ethics (2016).

Associate Professor Chin was Director of the Undergraduate HeLP Track (AY 2013-14), Director of Graduate Studies (2013-2016), Research Director at CBmE (2014 – 2017) and Acting Director of CBmE (2016-2017). She has served as a member of the hospital ethics committees of the National University Hospital, Ang Mo Kio-Thye Kuan Hospital, and the Institute of Mental Health, the Honorary Secretary of the National Ethics Capability Committee of the Singapore (2014 – 2016), Ministry of Health, a member of the National Transplant Ethics Panel of Laypersons (2009 – ), Vice-Chair of the Ethics and Regulatory Workgroup of the Precision Medicine Steering Committee (2016 – ), and a Board Member of the International Association of Bioethics (2012 – 2016).

Dawit Desalegn, Ethiopia
Dr. Dawit Desalegn is currently a faculty in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the Addis Ababa University – College of Health Sciences. He is also a coordinator of the “medical ethics collaborative project” between university of Bergen and AAU-CHSSOM since 2011 and currently appointed as the head of the “Center for Medical Ethics & Priority Setting” at the same university. He received his medical degree from the University of Gondar in 1999 and his Certificate in Obstetrics and Gynecology in 2006 at AAUCHS-SOM. Since completing a clinical fellowship in Gynecology Oncology at the Addis Ababa University in collaboration with University of Michigan in 2015, he has been actively involved with the continuing medical education and with national professional organizations such as the Ethiopian Society of Obstetricians and Gynecologist [ESOG] (served as executive board member for four years), European Society of Gynecologist and Obstetricians [ESGO], and Ethiopian Medical Association [EMA]. He has served as an associate dean at the AAU-CHS-SOM for three years. His clinical and research interests involve a variety of women’s health issues such as Gender, Ethics and Priority setting, and gynecologic cancer.

Michael Dunn, UK
Michael Dunn is a Lecturer in Health and Social Care Ethics at the Ethox Centre, University of Oxford. In this role, he also directs undergraduate medical ethics, law and professionalism education in Oxford’s Clinical School, and the Ethox Centre’s graduate research training programme within the Nuffield Department of Population Health. Dr Dunn’s academic research interests span a range of issues in healthcare ethics, social care ethics, and health law. The predominant focus of his current work seeks to address ethical questions presented by the development and expansion of community-based and long-term care practice, law and policy – both in the UK and internationally. He is the author of over 50 peer reviewed journal articles and book chapters on these topic areas. Two co-edited books have recently been published, including Empirical Bioethics: Theoretical and Practical Perspectives (CUP, 2016), and a further book, Medical Ethics: A Very Short Introduction, 2nd ed, co-authored with Tony Hope, will be published shortly (OUP, 2018). Dr Dunn holds undergraduate and postgraduate degrees from the University of Cambridge, and he has held visiting positions at the National University of Singapore, the University of Tokyo, the University of Oslo, the University of Bradford, and the Hastings Center, New York. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy, an Associate Editor of the Journal of Medical Ethics, the Book Reviews Editor of Ethics and Social Welfare, and a member of both clinical and research ethics committees. 

Bobbie Farsides, UK
Bobbie Farsides started teaching medical ethics over 30 years ago at the University of Keele. In 1996 she moved to King’s College London and began developing her research in the area of empirical bioethics.  Her work has focussed on the experience of health care professionals and scientists working in ethically contested fields of biomedicine. Having spent her early career in a philosophy department Bobbie retained an interest theoretical and conceptual work, but during her time at King’s she also became interested in the ethicist’s role in public policy. For the last decade Bobbie has been Professor of Clinical and Biomedical Ethics at BSMS whilst also serving on a range of national bodies including most recently the HFEA.  

Ann Gallagher, UK

Mark Kuczewski, USA

Mark G. Kuczewski, PhD, is the Fr. Michael I. English, S.J., Professor of Medical Ethics. He is also the director of the Neiswanger Institute for Bioethics and Health Policy and a past president of the American Society for Bioethics and Humanities (ASBH). His current interests include attention to the role of culture and spirituality in decision making. This has led him to a particular interest in the bioethical issues related to the recent wave of immigration to the United States. He has been an articulate spokesperson for the just and equitable treatment of immigrant patients. His writings argue for a prohibition on forced medical repatriation and the severing of any relationship between health insurance and immigration status.  Mark served as the project manager to revise the admissions policy of the Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine to include Dreamers. This resulted in Stritch becoming the first medical school in the nation to openly welcome applications from Dreamers of DACA status. For this work, Mark has received the Moral Courage Award (with Linda Brubaker, MD) from Faith in Public Life, Special Recognition (with Linda Brubaker, MD) from the Illinois Legislative Latino Caucus Foundation, the Carmen Velasquez Warrior Award (with Linda Brubaker, MD) from Alivio Medical Center, and the Policy Award (with Linda Brubaker, MD) from the Health & Medicine Policy Research Group. Mark was also named co-winner of the Loyola University Chicago 2017 Faculty Member of the Year

Bert Molewijk, Netherlands 

Bert Molewijk (1966) is Associate Professor Clinical Ethics Support at both the Centre for Medical Ethics (CME) at the University of Oslo (UIO) in Norway, and at the Department of Medical Humanities of the VU Medical Centre in Amsterdam. After being a mental health care nurse, he studied Health Care Sciences at the Maastricht University (free master Medical Ethics) and finished his PhD on Patient autonomy, evidence-based risk information and empirical ethics at the Leiden University Medical Centre (2006).

He works as senior researcher and trainer within the field of clinical ethics support, in particular Moral Case Deliberation (MCD). At VUmc, he is team leader and member of the Executive Board of the Department of Medical Humanities. He is founder and director of the European Clinical Ethics Network (ECEN) since 2005 and board member of the European Association for Centers of Medical Ethics (EACME) since 2016. He is coordinator of both the Dutch (www.NEON.nl) and Norwegian national networks for ethics support and\or ethics facilitators. He edited several thematic journal issues on (evaluation and theory of) clinical ethics support and empirical ethics. He developed several international ethics trainings, including the implementation and evaluation of these trainings.

Alison Murdoch, UK

Alison Murdoch established The Newcastle Fertility Centre at Life which is now recognised as one of the leading NHS fertility centres in the UK.   The clinic provides a full range of treatments for subfertility including IVF, sperm and egg donation.

The principal research interests in the Department relate to the molecular processes which control cell division in the earliest stages of human development (oocyte meiosis and early embryo cell division).  Recent successful research to reduce the risk of transmission of mitochondrial disease to the baby has led to UK legislation to enable the translation of the techniques to clinical practice.  Her principal role in the team is the ethical and regulatory issues related to embryo research and to the donation of embryos and eggs for research.  

Professor Murdoch is past Chair of the British Fertility Society. She has been closely involved with the Department of Health and the regulators in the setting of clinical and laboratory standards in this field.  She is a member of the Advisory Committee on the Safety of Blood, Tissues and Organs and a past member of the Nuffield Council of Bioethics.

Ingrid Miljeteig, Norway

Ingrid Miljeteig is a medical doctor and an associate professor in medical ethics at the University of Bergen, Norway. She works on mapping out clinical ethical dilemmas in low-income countries, with a special focus on how resource scarcity influence decision making at the bedside. Her other field of interest is on developing and evaluating teaching programs and capacity building initiatives in medical ethics, both in resource deprived settings and in countries as Norway. She is the director of the ethics collaboration between the Addis Ababa University and the University of Bergen. The collaboration has led to establishment of a Center for Medical Ethics and Priority Setting, where training programs and a clinical ethics committee are now established and where various research projects are initiated. She is currently living in Tanzania where she conducts fieldworks in several clinical departments.

 

Stella Rieter-Theil, Switzerland
Professor Rieter-Theil is currently Director, Department Clinical Ethics, Psychiatric Hospitals of the University Basel and University Hospital Basel / University of Basel, Switzerland. As a pioneer of clinical ethics Stella Reiter-Theil is founding co-director of the ICCEC series and running an active ethics support service in university medicine with accompanying research and also qualifying mentees for ethics consultation. Moreover, she has been Professor of Medical and Health Ethics at the University’s Medical Faculty since 2001. Her research covers ethics studies in a wide range of clinical fields. Several projects such as doctoral dissertations or publications under her supervision received awards. She has served on national (Austrian, German, Swiss) and international ethics committees.

Claudia Turner, Cambodia/UK
Since 2015, Claudia has been the Chief Executive Officer of Angkor Hospital for Children, a non-profit children’s health care organisation based in Siem Reap Cambodia. Claudia is also a UK-trained consultant paediatrician and clinician scientist with the University of Oxford.

Claudia spent six years as a research paediatrician with the Shoklo Malaria Research Unit (SMRU) on the Thailand – Myanmar border where she worked in Maela Camp for displaced persons. She conducted research on infant and early childhood pneumonia and early onset neonatal sepsis. This work resulted in her PhD thesis describing in detail the epidemiology of these conditions in the refugee population and interventions which were successful in substantially reducing neonatal mortality. In 2012 Claudia moved to Cambodia to be the Director of Clinical Research at the Cambodia Oxford Medical Research Unit in Siem Reap, a close collaborative partner of the Angkor Hospital for Children. Claudia’s research to date has resulted in over 40 published scientific papers.

Ross Upshur, Canada
Dr. Ross Upshur is currently the Head of the Division of Clinical Public Health at the Dalla Lana School of Public Health, Scientific Director, Bridgepoint Collaboratory for Research and Innovation and Associate Director of the Lunenfeld Tanenbaum Research Institute, Sinai Health System.  At the University of Toronto, he is a Professor in the Dalla Lana School of Public Health and the Department of Family and Community Medicine, affiliate member of the Institute for the History and Philosophy of Science and Technology and Adjunct Senior Scientist at the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences. 

In 2015, Dr. Upshur was named one of the Top 20 Pioneers in Family Medicine Research and Family Medicine Researcher of the Year, by the College of Family Physicians of Canada. Dr. Upshur is the former Director of the University of Toronto Joint Centre for Bioethics (2006-2011) and was Canada Research Chair in Primary Care Research (2005-2015).  He is a member of The Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada and the College of Family Physicians of Canada

Dr. Upshur’s research focuses on the intersection of primary care and public health. His current interests include managing complex chronic disease in aging adults, clinical measurement, the concept of evidence in health care, philosophy of medicine including medical epistemology and the integration of ethics and clinical reasoning, public health ethics, global health ethics, empirical approaches in bioethics, primary care research methods, time series applications in health services research, communicable disease and environmental epidemiology. He has held numerous peer reviewed grants. He has over 350 publications including more than 200 peer reviewed publications spanning these domains. He has served on ethics committees for the Public Health Agency of Canada, the World Health Organization and Doctors without Borders.

Conference Themes


Clinical ethics in translation: linking practice with research, learning and policy

There are 5 sub themes


Ethical challenges in the clinic: an impetus for research and education
Emerging challenges for clinical ethics include the use of innovative and unlicensed treatments, bedside rationing, and boundaries between health and social care

Theoretical foundations and conceptual frameworks of clinical ethics support
Will developing and articulating theoretical foundations for clinical ethics help to strengthen practice? What counts as a theoretical foundation and is it required? How can we foster dialogue between practice and theory?

Empirical ethics research: emerging from and informing clinical ethics practice
There are many questions that clinical ethics can pose for researchers. How can we identify and build on examples of high quality research to improve practice?

Translating clinical ethics across global contexts
How does clinical ethics practice, research and education translate across cultures and what can we learn from each other to improve our own practice.

Translating clinical ethics into advocacy and policy
What role should clinical ethics have in shaping policy at a regional, national or international level on issues such as migrant health, abortion or transplant ethics? Should clinical ethicists act as advocates for patients in the wider health care environment?

21st June

0800-0900

Registration

 

0900-0915

Welcome address

Wing May Kong: Chair, Board of Trustees Institute of Medical Ethics

0915-1115

Opening plenaries: Philosophical foundations and clinical practice. Does clinical ethics need theory

1.    Bobbie Farsides
Professor of bioethics and clinical ethics, Brighton Sussex Medical School UK

2.    Bert Molewijk
Associate Professor, Clinical Ethics Support at both the Centre for Medical Ethics (CME) at the University of Oslo (UIO) in Norway, and at the Department of Medical Humanities of the VU Medical Centre in Amsterdam

3.    Ross Upshur
Canada Research Chair in Primary Care Research; Professor,  Department of Family and Community Medicine and Dalla Lana  School of Public Health, University of Toronto Former Director  of  Joint Centre for Bioethics Toronto Canada

1115-1145

Coffee Break

 

1145-1315

Parallel sessions 1

 

1315-1415

Lunch

 

1415-1545

Plenary session 2: Translating clinical ethics across global contexts

1.    Ingrid Miljeteig
Associate Professor in Medical Ethics, Institute for global health  and community medicine. University of Bergen and
Dawit Desalegn, Director of Centre for ethics and priority setting,  School of Medicine Addis Ababa 

2.    Dr Claudia Turner
Director of the children’s hospital in Ankor Wat, Cambodia
.

1545-1615

Coffee Break

 
  1615-1715

Parallel sessions 2

 

 

1715-1830

Poster Viewing and Drinks reception

 

1830-1930

Public syposium: ‘Inside the ethics committee’

 

22nd June

0830-0900

Registration

 

0900-1015

Plenary session 3: extending the boundaries of clinical ethics practice

4.  Alison Murdoch 
Professor of reproductive medicine Newcastle University (former member of Newcastle hospital clinical ethics committee)

5.  Mark G. Kuczewski 
Professor of Medical Ethics Director of the Neiswanger Institute for Bioethics and Health Policy and past president of the American Society for Bioethics and Humanities (ASBH)

1015-1045

Coffee Break

 

1045-1245

Parallel sessions 3

 

1245-1345

Lunch

 

1345-1500

Plenary session 4: Ethical responsibilities at the interface of health and social care

1.  Jacqueline Chin 
Associate Professor, Centre for Biomedical Ethics (CBmE), Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine

2.  Anne Gallagher 
Professor of Ethics and Care University of Surrey

1500-1530

Coffee Break

 

1530-1700

Parallel sessions 4

 
 

 

 

1900

Conference Dinner

The Conference Dinner will take place at the MacDonald Randolph Hotel and will feature a welcome drink, a three-course meal plus entertainment from the fabulous Jukebox Band.  

Please note that there is an additional charge of £55.00 to attend the dinner.

23rd June

0830-0900

Registration

 

0900-0915

Presentation of Hans Shwager award and poster/presentation prizes

 

09150-1030

Plenary session 5: Clinical ethics research and practice

1.  Michael Dunn 
University of Oxford

2.  Professor Stella Reiter-Theil
University of Basel

1030-1100

Coffee Break

 

1100-1230

Parallel sessions 5

 

1230-1300

Closing remarks and announcement of 2019 conference

 

1300

Conference close and Lunch

 

Confirmed Speakers



Jacqueline Chin, Singapore

Dr Jacqueline Chin is Associate Professor at the Centre for Biomedical Ethics (CBmE), Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine. Trained as a moral philosopher at the University of Oxford, her research of the past nine years addresses national and globally-relevant capacity-building in biomedical ethics. She has conceptualized and led key projects such as CENTRES (since 2009), commissioned by the Ministry of Health for networking and supporting clinical ethics committees in Singapore’s restructured and private hospitals; What Doctors Say About Care of the Dying, an empirical ethics study of doctors’ perspectives on end-of-life decisions (2010–2011) aimed at informing professional stakeholders, policymakers and the public; Making Difficult Decisions with Patients and Families (2014), an online casebook (www.bioethicscasebook.sg) which recently featured in a 2015 Hastings Center Report’s special collection of papers on Bioethics Education by the US Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues; and Vol 2 of the online casebook, Caring for Older People in an Ageing Society (2017), which engages with ethical challenges of eldercare among health workers in community care settings.

Her publications in medical education include ‘Does Ethics Education Produce Ethical Doctors’ (2007)  and ‘Evaluating the Effects of an Integrated Medical Ethics Curriculum on First-Year Students’ (2011), co-authored with Alastair V Campbell and Teck-Chuan Voo, et al. Other research publications and commentaries include: ‘Integration of palliative and supportive cancer care in Asia’ in the Lancet Oncology (2012), ‘Transplant tourism or international transplant medicine? A case for making the distinction’ in the American Journal of Transplantation (2012), and ‘Evolving legal responses to dependence on families in New Zealand and Singapore healthcare’ in the Journal of Medical Ethics (2012), ‘Where families and healthcare meet.’ Journal of Medical Ethics (2014), Clarifying the best interests standard: the elaborative and enumerative strategies in public policy-making, Journal of Medical Ethics (2016).

Associate Professor Chin was Director of the Undergraduate HeLP Track (AY 2013-14), Director of Graduate Studies (2013-2016), Research Director at CBmE (2014 – 2017) and Acting Director of CBmE (2016-2017). She has served as a member of the hospital ethics committees of the National University Hospital, Ang Mo Kio-Thye Kuan Hospital, and the Institute of Mental Health, the Honorary Secretary of the National Ethics Capability Committee of the Singapore (2014 – 2016), Ministry of Health, a member of the National Transplant Ethics Panel of Laypersons (2009 – ), Vice-Chair of the Ethics and Regulatory Workgroup of the Precision Medicine Steering Committee (2016 – ), and a Board Member of the International Association of Bioethics (2012 – 2016).

 

Dawit Desalegn, Ethiopia
Dr. Dawit Desalegn is currently a faculty in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the Addis Ababa University – College of Health Sciences. He is also a coordinator of the “medical ethics collaborative project” between university of Bergen and AAU-CHSSOM since 2011 and currently appointed as the head of the “Center for Medical Ethics & Priority Setting” at the same university. He received his medical degree from the University of Gondar in 1999 and his Certificate in Obstetrics and Gynecology in 2006 at AAUCHS-SOM. Since completing a clinical fellowship in Gynecology Oncology at the Addis Ababa University in collaboration with University of Michigan in 2015, he has been actively involved with the continuing medical education and with national professional organizations such as the Ethiopian Society of Obstetricians and Gynecologist [ESOG] (served as executive board member for four years), European Society of Gynecologist and Obstetricians [ESGO], and Ethiopian Medical Association [EMA]. He has served as an associate dean at the AAU-CHS-SOM for three years. His clinical and research interests involve a variety of women’s health issues such as Gender, Ethics and Priority setting, and gynecologic cancer.

Michael Dunn, UK

Michael Dunn is a Lecturer in Health and Social Care Ethics at the Ethox Centre, University of Oxford. In this role, he also directs undergraduate medical ethics, law and professionalism education in Oxford’s Clinical School, and the Ethox Centre’s graduate research training programme within the Nuffield Department of Population Health. Dr Dunn’s academic research interests span a range of issues in healthcare ethics, social care ethics, and health law. The predominant focus of his current work seeks to address ethical questions presented by the development and expansion of community-based and long-term care practice, law and policy – both in the UK and internationally. He is the author of over 50 peer reviewed journal articles and book chapters on these topic areas. Two co-edited books have recently been published, including Empirical Bioethics: Theoretical and Practical Perspectives (CUP, 2016), and a further book, Medical Ethics: A Very Short Introduction, 2nd ed, co-authored with Tony Hope, will be published shortly (OUP, 2018). Dr Dunn holds undergraduate and postgraduate degrees from the University of Cambridge, and he has held visiting positions at the National University of Singapore, the University of Tokyo, the University of Oslo, the University of Bradford, and the Hastings Center, New York. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy, an Associate Editor of the Journal of Medical Ethics, the Book Reviews Editor of Ethics and Social Welfare, and a member of both clinical and research ethics committees. 

Bobbie Farsides, UK
Bobbie Farsides started teaching medical ethics over 30 years ago at the University of Keele. In 1996 she moved to King’s College London and began developing her research in the area of empirical bioethics.  Her work has focussed on the experience of health care professionals and scientists working in ethically contested fields of biomedicine. Having spent her early career in a philosophy department Bobbie retained an interest theoretical and conceptual work, but during her time at King’s she also became interested in the ethicist’s role in public policy. For the last decade Bobbie has been Professor of Clinical and Biomedical Ethics at BSMS whilst also serving on a range of national bodies including most recently the HFEA.  

Ann Gallagher, UK

Mark Kuczewski, USA

Mark G. Kuczewski, PhD, is the Fr. Michael I. English, S.J., Professor of Medical Ethics. He is also the director of the Neiswanger Institute for Bioethics and Health Policy and a past president of the American Society for Bioethics and Humanities (ASBH). His current interests include attention to the role of culture and spirituality in decision making. This has led him to a particular interest in the bioethical issues related to the recent wave of immigration to the United States. He has been an articulate spokesperson for the just and equitable treatment of immigrant patients. His writings argue for a prohibition on forced medical repatriation and the severing of any relationship between health insurance and immigration status.  Mark served as the project manager to revise the admissions policy of the Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine to include Dreamers. This resulted in Stritch becoming the first medical school in the nation to openly welcome applications from Dreamers of DACA status. For this work, Mark has received the Moral Courage Award (with Linda Brubaker, MD) from Faith in Public Life, Special Recognition (with Linda Brubaker, MD) from the Illinois Legislative Latino Caucus Foundation, the Carmen Velasquez Warrior Award (with Linda Brubaker, MD) from Alivio Medical Center, and the Policy Award (with Linda Brubaker, MD) from the Health & Medicine Policy Research Group. Mark was also named co-winner of the Loyola University Chicago 2017 Faculty Member of the Year

Bert Molewijk, Netherlands

Bert Molewijk (1966) is Associate Professor Clinical Ethics Support at both the Centre for Medical Ethics (CME) at the University of Oslo (UIO) in Norway, and at the Department of Medical Humanities of the VU Medical Centre in Amsterdam. After being a mental health care nurse, he studied Health Care Sciences at the Maastricht University (free master Medical Ethics) and finished his PhD on Patient autonomy, evidence-based risk information and empirical ethics at the Leiden University Medical Centre (2006).

He works as senior researcher and trainer within the field of clinical ethics support, in particular Moral Case Deliberation (MCD). At VUmc, he is team leader and member of the Executive Board of the Department of Medical Humanities. He is founder and director of the European Clinical Ethics Network (ECEN) since 2005 and board member of the European Association for Centers of Medical Ethics (EACME) since 2016. He is coordinator of both the Dutch (www.NEON.nl) and Norwegian national networks for ethics support and\or ethics facilitators. He edited several thematic journal issues on (evaluation and theory of) clinical ethics support and empirical ethics. He developed several international ethics trainings, including the implementation and evaluation of these trainings.


Alison Murdoch, UK

Alison Murdoch established The Newcastle Fertility Centre at Life which is now recognised as one of the leading NHS fertility centres in the UK.   The clinic provides a full range of treatments for subfertility including IVF, sperm and egg donation.

The principal research interests in the Department relate to the molecular processes which control cell division in the earliest stages of human development (oocyte meiosis and early embryo cell division).  Recent successful research to reduce the risk of transmission of mitochondrial disease to the baby has led to UK legislation to enable the translation of the techniques to clinical practice.  Her principal role in the team is the ethical and regulatory issues related to embryo research and to the donation of embryos and eggs for research.  

Professor Murdoch is past Chair of the British Fertility Society. She has been closely involved with the Department of Health and the regulators in the setting of clinical and laboratory standards in this field.  She is a member of the Advisory Committee on the Safety of Blood, Tissues and Organs and a past member of the Nuffield Council of Bioethics.

Ingrid Miljeteig, Norway

Ingrid Miljeteig is a medical doctor and an associate professor in medical ethics at the University of Bergen, Norway. She works on mapping out clinical ethical dilemmas in low-income countries, with a special focus on how resource scarcity influence decision making at the bedside. Her other field of interest is on developing and evaluating teaching programs and capacity building initiatives in medical ethics, both in resource deprived settings and in countries as Norway. She is the director of the ethics collaboration between the Addis Ababa University and the University of Bergen. The collaboration has led to establishment of a Center for Medical Ethics and Priority Setting, where training programs and a clinical ethics committee are now established and where various research projects are initiated. She is currently living in Tanzania where she conducts fieldworks in several clinical departments.

Stella Rieter-Theil, Switzerland
Professor Rieter-Theil is currently Director, Department Clinical Ethics, Psychiatric Hospitals of the University Basel and University Hospital Basel / University of Basel, Switzerland. As a pioneer of clinical ethics Stella Reiter-Theil is founding co-director of the ICCEC series and running an active ethics support service in university medicine with accompanying research and also qualifying mentees for ethics consultation. Moreover, she has been Professor of Medical and Health Ethics at the University’s Medical Faculty since 2001. Her research covers ethics studies in a wide range of clinical fields. Several projects such as doctoral dissertations or publications under her supervision received awards. She has served on national (Austrian, German, Swiss) and international ethics committees.


Claudia Turner, Cambodia/UK
Since 2015, Claudia has been the Chief Executive Officer of Angkor Hospital for Children, a non-profit children’s health care organisation based in Siem Reap Cambodia. Claudia is also a UK-trained consultant paediatrician and clinician scientist with the University of Oxford.

Claudia spent six years as a research paediatrician with the Shoklo Malaria Research Unit (SMRU) on the Thailand – Myanmar border where she worked in Maela Camp for displaced persons. She conducted research on infant and early childhood pneumonia and early onset neonatal sepsis. This work resulted in her PhD thesis describing in detail the epidemiology of these conditions in the refugee population and interventions which were successful in substantially reducing neonatal mortality. In 2012 Claudia moved to Cambodia to be the Director of Clinical Research at the Cambodia Oxford Medical Research Unit in Siem Reap, a close collaborative partner of the Angkor Hospital for Children. Claudia’s research to date has resulted in over 40 published scientific papers.

Ross Upshur, Canada

Dr. Ross Upshur is currently the Head of the Division of Clinical Public Health at the Dalla Lana School of Public Health, Scientific Director, Bridgepoint Collaboratory for Research and Innovation and Associate Director of the Lunenfeld Tanenbaum Research Institute, Sinai Health System.  At the University of Toronto, he is a Professor in the Dalla Lana School of Public Health and the Department of Family and Community Medicine, affiliate member of the Institute for the History and Philosophy of Science and Technology and Adjunct Senior Scientist at the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences. 

In 2015, Dr. Upshur was named one of the Top 20 Pioneers in Family Medicine Research and Family Medicine Researcher of the Year, by the College of Family Physicians of Canada. Dr. Upshur is the former Director of the University of Toronto Joint Centre for Bioethics (2006-2011) and was Canada Research Chair in Primary Care Research (2005-2015).  He is a member of The Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada and the College of Family Physicians of Canada

Dr. Upshur’s research focuses on the intersection of primary care and public health. His current interests include managing complex chronic disease in aging adults, clinical measurement, the concept of evidence in health care, philosophy of medicine including medical epistemology and the integration of ethics and clinical reasoning, public health ethics, global health ethics, empirical approaches in bioethics, primary care research methods, time series applications in health services research, communicable disease and environmental epidemiology. He has held numerous peer reviewed grants. He has over 350 publications including more than 200 peer reviewed publications spanning these domains. He has served on ethics committees for the Public Health Agency of Canada, the World Health Organization and Doctors without Borders.

Confirmed Speakers



Jacqueline Chin, Singapore

Dr Jacqueline Chin is Associate Professor at the Centre for Biomedical Ethics (CBmE), Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine. Trained as a moral philosopher at the University of Oxford, her research of the past nine years addresses national and globally-relevant capacity-building in biomedical ethics. She has conceptualized and led key projects such as CENTRES (since 2009), commissioned by the Ministry of Health for networking and supporting clinical ethics committees in Singapore’s restructured and private hospitals; What Doctors Say About Care of the Dying, an empirical ethics study of doctors’ perspectives on end-of-life decisions (2010–2011) aimed at informing professional stakeholders, policymakers and the public; Making Difficult Decisions with Patients and Families (2014), an online casebook (www.bioethicscasebook.sg) which recently featured in a 2015 Hastings Center Report’s special collection of papers on Bioethics Education by the US Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues; and Vol 2 of the online casebook, Caring for Older People in an Ageing Society (2017), which engages with ethical challenges of eldercare among health workers in community care settings.

Her publications in medical education include ‘Does Ethics Education Produce Ethical Doctors’ (2007)  and ‘Evaluating the Effects of an Integrated Medical Ethics Curriculum on First-Year Students’ (2011), co-authored with Alastair V Campbell and Teck-Chuan Voo, et al. Other research publications and commentaries include: ‘Integration of palliative and supportive cancer care in Asia’ in the Lancet Oncology (2012), ‘Transplant tourism or international transplant medicine? A case for making the distinction’ in the American Journal of Transplantation (2012), and ‘Evolving legal responses to dependence on families in New Zealand and Singapore healthcare’ in the Journal of Medical Ethics (2012), ‘Where families and healthcare meet.’ Journal of Medical Ethics (2014), Clarifying the best interests standard: the elaborative and enumerative strategies in public policy-making, Journal of Medical Ethics (2016).

Associate Professor Chin was Director of the Undergraduate HeLP Track (AY 2013-14), Director of Graduate Studies (2013-2016), Research Director at CBmE (2014 – 2017) and Acting Director of CBmE (2016-2017). She has served as a member of the hospital ethics committees of the National University Hospital, Ang Mo Kio-Thye Kuan Hospital, and the Institute of Mental Health, the Honorary Secretary of the National Ethics Capability Committee of the Singapore (2014 – 2016), Ministry of Health, a member of the National Transplant Ethics Panel of Laypersons (2009 – ), Vice-Chair of the Ethics and Regulatory Workgroup of the Precision Medicine Steering Committee (2016 – ), and a Board Member of the International Association of Bioethics (2012 – 2016).

 

Dawit Desalegn, Ethiopia
Dr. Dawit Desalegn is currently a faculty in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the Addis Ababa University – College of Health Sciences. He is also a coordinator of the “medical ethics collaborative project” between university of Bergen and AAU-CHSSOM since 2011 and currently appointed as the head of the “Center for Medical Ethics & Priority Setting” at the same university. He received his medical degree from the University of Gondar in 1999 and his Certificate in Obstetrics and Gynecology in 2006 at AAUCHS-SOM. Since completing a clinical fellowship in Gynecology Oncology at the Addis Ababa University in collaboration with University of Michigan in 2015, he has been actively involved with the continuing medical education and with national professional organizations such as the Ethiopian Society of Obstetricians and Gynecologist [ESOG] (served as executive board member for four years), European Society of Gynecologist and Obstetricians [ESGO], and Ethiopian Medical Association [EMA]. He has served as an associate dean at the AAU-CHS-SOM for three years. His clinical and research interests involve a variety of women’s health issues such as Gender, Ethics and Priority setting, and gynecologic cancer.

Michael Dunn, UK

Michael Dunn is a Lecturer in Health and Social Care Ethics at the Ethox Centre, University of Oxford. In this role, he also directs undergraduate medical ethics, law and professionalism education in Oxford’s Clinical School, and the Ethox Centre’s graduate research training programme within the Nuffield Department of Population Health. Dr Dunn’s academic research interests span a range of issues in healthcare ethics, social care ethics, and health law. The predominant focus of his current work seeks to address ethical questions presented by the development and expansion of community-based and long-term care practice, law and policy – both in the UK and internationally. He is the author of over 50 peer reviewed journal articles and book chapters on these topic areas. Two co-edited books have recently been published, including Empirical Bioethics: Theoretical and Practical Perspectives (CUP, 2016), and a further book, Medical Ethics: A Very Short Introduction, 2nd ed, co-authored with Tony Hope, will be published shortly (OUP, 2018). Dr Dunn holds undergraduate and postgraduate degrees from the University of Cambridge, and he has held visiting positions at the National University of Singapore, the University of Tokyo, the University of Oslo, the University of Bradford, and the Hastings Center, New York. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy, an Associate Editor of the Journal of Medical Ethics, the Book Reviews Editor of Ethics and Social Welfare, and a member of both clinical and research ethics committees. 

Bobbie Farsides, UK
Bobbie Farsides started teaching medical ethics over 30 years ago at the University of Keele. In 1996 she moved to King’s College London and began developing her research in the area of empirical bioethics.  Her work has focussed on the experience of health care professionals and scientists working in ethically contested fields of biomedicine. Having spent her early career in a philosophy department Bobbie retained an interest theoretical and conceptual work, but during her time at King’s she also became interested in the ethicist’s role in public policy. For the last decade Bobbie has been Professor of Clinical and Biomedical Ethics at BSMS whilst also serving on a range of national bodies including most recently the HFEA.  

Ann Gallagher, UK

Mark Kuczewski, USA

Mark G. Kuczewski, PhD, is the Fr. Michael I. English, S.J., Professor of Medical Ethics. He is also the director of the Neiswanger Institute for Bioethics and Health Policy and a past president of the American Society for Bioethics and Humanities (ASBH). His current interests include attention to the role of culture and spirituality in decision making. This has led him to a particular interest in the bioethical issues related to the recent wave of immigration to the United States. He has been an articulate spokesperson for the just and equitable treatment of immigrant patients. His writings argue for a prohibition on forced medical repatriation and the severing of any relationship between health insurance and immigration status.  Mark served as the project manager to revise the admissions policy of the Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine to include Dreamers. This resulted in Stritch becoming the first medical school in the nation to openly welcome applications from Dreamers of DACA status. For this work, Mark has received the Moral Courage Award (with Linda Brubaker, MD) from Faith in Public Life, Special Recognition (with Linda Brubaker, MD) from the Illinois Legislative Latino Caucus Foundation, the Carmen Velasquez Warrior Award (with Linda Brubaker, MD) from Alivio Medical Center, and the Policy Award (with Linda Brubaker, MD) from the Health & Medicine Policy Research Group. Mark was also named co-winner of the Loyola University Chicago 2017 Faculty Member of the Year

Bert Molewijk, Netherlands

Bert Molewijk (1966) is Associate Professor Clinical Ethics Support at both the Centre for Medical Ethics (CME) at the University of Oslo (UIO) in Norway, and at the Department of Medical Humanities of the VU Medical Centre in Amsterdam. After being a mental health care nurse, he studied Health Care Sciences at the Maastricht University (free master Medical Ethics) and finished his PhD on Patient autonomy, evidence-based risk information and empirical ethics at the Leiden University Medical Centre (2006).

He works as senior researcher and trainer within the field of clinical ethics support, in particular Moral Case Deliberation (MCD). At VUmc, he is team leader and member of the Executive Board of the Department of Medical Humanities. He is founder and director of the European Clinical Ethics Network (ECEN) since 2005 and board member of the European Association for Centers of Medical Ethics (EACME) since 2016. He is coordinator of both the Dutch (www.NEON.nl) and Norwegian national networks for ethics support and\or ethics facilitators. He edited several thematic journal issues on (evaluation and theory of) clinical ethics support and empirical ethics. He developed several international ethics trainings, including the implementation and evaluation of these trainings.

Alison Murdoch, UK

Alison Murdoch established The Newcastle Fertility Centre at Life which is now recognised as one of the leading NHS fertility centres in the UK.   The clinic provides a full range of treatments for subfertility including IVF, sperm and egg donation.

The principal research interests in the Department relate to the molecular processes which control cell division in the earliest stages of human development (oocyte meiosis and early embryo cell division).  Recent successful research to reduce the risk of transmission of mitochondrial disease to the baby has led to UK legislation to enable the translation of the techniques to clinical practice.  Her principal role in the team is the ethical and regulatory issues related to embryo research and to the donation of embryos and eggs for research.  

Professor Murdoch is past Chair of the British Fertility Society. She has been closely involved with the Department of Health and the regulators in the setting of clinical and laboratory standards in this field.  She is a member of the Advisory Committee on the Safety of Blood, Tissues and Organs and a past member of the Nuffield Council of Bioethics.

Ingrid Miljeteig, Norway

Ingrid Miljeteig is a medical doctor and an associate professor in medical ethics at the University of Bergen, Norway. She works on mapping out clinical ethical dilemmas in low-income countries, with a special focus on how resource scarcity influence decision making at the bedside. Her other field of interest is on developing and evaluating teaching programs and capacity building initiatives in medical ethics, both in resource deprived settings and in countries as Norway. She is the director of the ethics collaboration between the Addis Ababa University and the University of Bergen. The collaboration has led to establishment of a Center for Medical Ethics and Priority Setting, where training programs and a clinical ethics committee are now established and where various research projects are initiated. She is currently living in Tanzania where she conducts fieldworks in several clinical departments.


Stella Rieter-Theil, Switzerland
Professor Rieter-Theil is currently Director, Department Clinical Ethics, Psychiatric Hospitals of the University Basel and University Hospital Basel / University of Basel, Switzerland. As a pioneer of clinical ethics Stella Reiter-Theil is founding co-director of the ICCEC series and running an active ethics support service in university medicine with accompanying research and also qualifying mentees for ethics consultation. Moreover, she has been Professor of Medical and Health Ethics at the University’s Medical Faculty since 2001. Her research covers ethics studies in a wide range of clinical fields. Several projects such as doctoral dissertations or publications under her supervision received awards. She has served on national (Austrian, German, Swiss) and international ethics committees.


Claudia Turner, Cambodia/UK
Since 2015, Claudia has been the Chief Executive Officer of Angkor Hospital for Children, a non-profit children’s health care organisation based in Siem Reap Cambodia. Claudia is also a UK-trained consultant paediatrician and clinician scientist with the University of Oxford.

Claudia spent six years as a research paediatrician with the Shoklo Malaria Research Unit (SMRU) on the Thailand – Myanmar border where she worked in Maela Camp for displaced persons. She conducted research on infant and early childhood pneumonia and early onset neonatal sepsis. This work resulted in her PhD thesis describing in detail the epidemiology of these conditions in the refugee population and interventions which were successful in substantially reducing neonatal mortality. In 2012 Claudia moved to Cambodia to be the Director of Clinical Research at the Cambodia Oxford Medical Research Unit in Siem Reap, a close collaborative partner of the Angkor Hospital for Children. Claudia’s research to date has resulted in over 40 published scientific papers.

Ross Upshur, Canada
Dr. Ross Upshur is currently the Head of the Division of Clinical Public Health at the Dalla Lana School of Public Health, Scientific Director, Bridgepoint Collaboratory for Research and Innovation and Associate Director of the Lunenfeld Tanenbaum Research Institute, Sinai Health System.  At the University of Toronto, he is a Professor in the Dalla Lana School of Public Health and the Department of Family and Community Medicine, affiliate member of the Institute for the History and Philosophy of Science and Technology and Adjunct Senior Scientist at the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences. 

In 2015, Dr. Upshur was named one of the Top 20 Pioneers in Family Medicine Research and Family Medicine Researcher of the Year, by the College of Family Physicians of Canada. Dr. Upshur is the former Director of the University of Toronto Joint Centre for Bioethics (2006-2011) and was Canada Research Chair in Primary Care Research (2005-2015).  He is a member of The Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada and the College of Family Physicians of Canada

Dr. Upshur’s research focuses on the intersection of primary care and public health. His current interests include managing complex chronic disease in aging adults, clinical measurement, the concept of evidence in health care, philosophy of medicine including medical epistemology and the integration of ethics and clinical reasoning, public health ethics, global health ethics, empirical approaches in bioethics, primary care research methods, time series applications in health services research, communicable disease and environmental epidemiology. He has held numerous peer reviewed grants. He has over 350 publications including more than 200 peer reviewed publications spanning these domains. He has served on ethics committees for the Public Health Agency of Canada, the World Health Organization and Doctors without Borders.